Difference between revisions of "Coptic Orthodox Church in Australia"

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Congregations of the '''[[Church of Alexandria (Coptic)|Coptic Orthodox Church in Australia]]''' are served by two Coptic Orthodox [[Diocese]]s with over 50 [[parish]]es, two Monasteries, two theological Colleges and five schools. The Coptic Church is a member of National Council of Churches in Australia. Currently, the Coptic Orthodox Church has as many 100,000 members in Australia (in Sydney alone it is estimated that there are 70,000 Copts, with numbers in Melbourne in the tens of thousands) <ref>In the year 2003, there was an estimated 70,000 Copts in New South Wales alone: -  {{cite hansard | url=http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LC20031112040 | house=Parliament of  
 
Congregations of the '''[[Church of Alexandria (Coptic)|Coptic Orthodox Church in Australia]]''' are served by two Coptic Orthodox [[Diocese]]s with over 50 [[parish]]es, two Monasteries, two theological Colleges and five schools. The Coptic Church is a member of National Council of Churches in Australia. Currently, the Coptic Orthodox Church has as many 100,000 members in Australia (in Sydney alone it is estimated that there are 70,000 Copts, with numbers in Melbourne in the tens of thousands) <ref>In the year 2003, there was an estimated 70,000 Copts in New South Wales alone: -  {{cite hansard | url=http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LC20031112040 | house=Parliament of  
 
NSW - Legislative Council | date= 12 November 2003| page=Page: 4772: - ''Coptic Orthodox Church (NSW) Property Trust Amendment Bill''}}</ref>.
 
NSW - Legislative Council | date= 12 November 2003| page=Page: 4772: - ''Coptic Orthodox Church (NSW) Property Trust Amendment Bill''}}</ref>.
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==See also==
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{{orientalchurches}}
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{{orthodoxyinaustralasiasmall}}
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*[[Coptic Orthodox Diocese of Melbourne]]
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*[[Coptic Orthodox Diocese of Sydney]]
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
*[http://www.melbcopts.org.au Diocese of Melbourne]
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*[http://www.melbcopts.org.au Coptic Orthodox Diocese of Melbourne]
*[http://www.coptic.org.au Diocese of Sydney]
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*[http://www.coptic.org.au Coptic Orthodox Diocese of Sydney]
*[http://www.ains.net.au/~johnh Coptic Orthodox Church of Australia (resource)]
 
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
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<references/>
 
* ''The Coptic Orthodox Church of Australia 1969-1995'', by Fr Matthew Attia, formerly Mr Maged Attia
 
* ''The Coptic Orthodox Church of Australia 1969-1995'', by Fr Matthew Attia, formerly Mr Maged Attia
  
 
[[Category:Coptic Orthodox Church]]
 
[[Category:Coptic Orthodox Church]]
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[[Category:Orthodoxy in Australia]]

Latest revision as of 02:30, October 2, 2014

This article is about Coptic Orthodoxy in Australia. For a list of Coptic parishes in Australia, see the List of Coptic Orthodox Churches in Australia.

Congregations of the Coptic Orthodox Church in Australia are served by two Coptic Orthodox Dioceses with over 50 parishes, two Monasteries, two theological Colleges and five schools. The Coptic Church is a member of National Council of Churches in Australia. Currently, the Coptic Orthodox Church has as many 100,000 members in Australia (in Sydney alone it is estimated that there are 70,000 Copts, with numbers in Melbourne in the tens of thousands) [1].

See also

Coptic Orthodox Cross

Churches of the Oriental
Orthodox Communion

Autocephalous Churches
Armenia | Alexandria | Ethiopia | Antioch | India | Eritrea
Autonomous Churches
Armenia: Cilicia | Jerusalem | Constantinople
Alexandria: Britain | Antioch: Jacobite Indian
This article forms part of the series
Orthodoxy in
Australasia
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External links

References

  1. In the year 2003, there was an estimated 70,000 Copts in New South Wales alone: - Template:Cite hansard
  • The Coptic Orthodox Church of Australia 1969-1995, by Fr Matthew Attia, formerly Mr Maged Attia