Changes

Jump to: navigation, search

John Chrysostom

4 bytes removed, 08:39, January 27, 2016
m
no edit summary
[[Image:John Chrysostom Russian.jpg|right|frame|Russian icon of St. John Chrysostom]]
Our father among the saints '''John Chrysostom''' (347-407), [[Archbishop]] of Constantinople, was a notable Christian [[bishop]] and preacher from the fourth and fifth centuries in Syria and Constantinople. He is famous for eloquence in public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority in the Church and in the [[Roman Empire]] of the time, and for a [[divine liturgyDivine Liturgy]] attributed to him. He had notable [[asceticism|ascetic]] sensibilities. After his death he was named '''Chrysostom''', which comes from the Greek Χρυσόστομος, "golden-mouthed." The [[Orthodox Church]] honors him as a [[saint]] ([[feast day]], [[November 13]]) and counts him among the [[Three Holy Hierarchs]] (feast day, [[January 30]]), together with Saints [[Basil the Great]] and [[Gregory the Theologian]]. Another feast day associated with him is [[January 27]], which commemorates the event in 437, thirty years after the saint's repose, when his [[relics]] were brought back to Constantinople from the place of his death.
John Chrysostom is also recognized by the [[Roman Catholic Church]], which considers him a saint and Doctor of the Church, and by the [[Church of England]], both of whom commemorate him on [[September 13]]. His relics were stolen from Constantinople by crusaders in 1204 and brought to Rome, but were returned on [[November 27]], 2004, by [[Pope]] [[John Paul II]].
He is sometimes referred to as "[[John of Antioch]]," but that name more properly refers to the bishop of Antioch in A.D. 429-441, who led a group of moderate Eastern bishops in the [[Nestorianism|Nestorian]] controversy.
99
edits

Navigation menu